1 week left to save $475 on a Social Membership!

Let’s get social!

You’ll love the all-new Penoby. We’ve revamped the club with new maintenance equipment, rehabilitated turf, & new golf carts (with a new beverage cart too)!

Our PVCC Social Membership includes full use of the Clubhouse & use of the pool. Social Members can also utilize the golf course for a discounted rate!

Save big on Social Memberships through the end of January!

Save $475 EACH on social membership options! 

With single, couple, & family options available, we have the perfect option for everyone!

  • $250 Individual Social Membership
  • $350 Couple Social Membership
  •  $450 Family Social membership

*$50 per month food & beverage minimum during June, July, & August.

Already have a membership?

Add on a social membership for your family for only $150!

How to Purchase

Purchase in our online store!
or
Call (207) 866-2423 to purchase over the phone.

Only Available through January!

THE RESURRECTION PASS

3 rounds, 4 courses, & the best golf in Maine. Make 2019 your year for golf. Buy a Resurrection Pass!

Now, when you purchase a Resurrection Pass, you will receive a digital voucher within 48 hours. Print this out & present at check-in to redeem.

EACH PASS INCLUDES

  • 2 passes for 18 holes w/cart good at Old Marsh Country Club, Penobscot Valley Country Club, or the Bath Golf Club
  • 1 pass for 18 holes (green fees only) at Highland Green Golf Club

4 COURSES

The Resurrection Pass gives you the best of Maine golf with access to 4 different Resurrection Golf properties.

Enjoy access to Old Marsh Country Club, the Bath Golf Club , Penobscot Valley Country Club, & Highland Green Golf Club , home of the Duck- Pub, Market, & Restaurant!

PURCHASE YOURS TODAY!

We have multiple ways to purchase- call, order online, or fill out our mail-in order form!

Call the Resurrection Golf HOTLINE at (207) 405-2000 to order over the phone.

SKIP WORK. PLAY GOLF.

Save on Social Memberships through the end of January!

Let’s get social!

You’ll love the all-new Penoby. We’ve revamped the club with new maintenance equipment, rehabilitated turf, & new golf carts (with a new beverage cart too)!

Our PVCC Social Membership includes full use of the Clubhouse & use of the pool. Social Members can also utilize the golf course for a discounted rate!

Save big on Social Memberships through the end of January!

Save $475 EACH on social membership options! 

With single, couple, & family options available, we have the perfect option for everyone!

  • $250 Individual Social Membership
  • $350 Couple Social Membership
  •  $450 Family Social membership

*$50 per month food & beverage minimum during June, July, & August.

Already have a membership?

Add on a social membership for your family for only $150!

How to Purchase

Purchase in our online store!
or
Call (207) 866-2423 to purchase over the phone.

How to Improve Your Putting: 3 Tour Secrets

Source: GolfDigest
By Butch Harmon

My dad used to say you can always tell great putters because all their putts have that “going in” look. I love that phrase, and it makes sense when you watch players who can really putt. They give their full effort every time, and they never talk themselves out of a putt. Look at it this way, there are only two things that can happen—you make it, or you miss it—and I can tell you, the best putters only think about one.

There’s no reason you can’t improve your putting. It’s the simplest swing you make; there are no bunkers, no out-of-bounds, no rough; you’re on a perfectly smooth surface; and the target is right there. Still, most golfers have a negative attitude, which I never understand. All you have to do is read the break, aim the face and start the ball on line. And, most important, decide to be positive.

Let’s look at a few things I’ve learned from great putters I’ve worked with—and get you dropping more putts. — With Peter Morrice

Here’s a drill I’ve watched Phil do over the years to hit putts with great speed. He finds a hole on the practice green and sticks three tees in the ground, at 30, 40 and 50 feet out. His goal is to roll three putts in a row from each tee into an imaginary three-foot circle around the hole. He starts at 40 feet and putts from there until he gets three in a row. Then he goes to 30, then 50—going out of order like this means you can’t just get in a groove.

Distance control is the big thing on long putts. If you judge the speed right, you’ll almost always have a simple second putt. But if you judge it wrong, you might leave yourself 10 or 12 feet. On long putts, I like the stroke to be a little longer and slower, so you can put some hit on the ball. When most golfers try to hit it harder, they get quick and jabby, which usually causes a mis-hit. You want the putterhead to accelerate through the ball, so think long and smooth.

Phil’s drill is a great test. And don’t just practice from one angle.

If you start with downhill, right-to-left putts, next time go uphill, left to right. Any 50-foot space will do—even use a water bottle for the hole (above). You’ll quickly see a difference in your distance control.

‘This is Phil’s 30-40-50 drill. Use it to learn distance control, and you’ll stop three-putting.’

Sneds is a great putter for the average golfer to copy because he gets on with it. Once he knows what he wants to do with a putt, he doesn’t waste any time. Taking longer only ups your stress level and invites you to start doubting what you’re doing.

If you watch Brandt, you’ll see when he’s reading a putt from behind the ball, he’s often making little air strokes with the right hand. Then, when he steps in, he makes three or four short practice strokes, always looking at the hole. He’s fine-tuning his feel.

His stroke is more of a pop action than what we normally see on the PGA Tour. It has a quicker pace and very little follow-through. I putt like that, too, because it helps me hit the ball on the right line. That’s what good putting is all about.

The best lesson here is to keep your focus simple. As you read your putt, imagine a three- or four-inch trough from your ball to the hole. You want to roll your ball down that trough, and that means getting it started on line. So instead of staring at the ball, track your eyes down your intended line, especially the first foot or two (below). Then give it a good, firm rap down that line—just like Sneds.

Rickie has become very competent with shorter putts. He ranks fourth on tour from a range of four to eight feet, making 82 percent. The best thing he does to hole these is simple enough for any golfer to adopt: He lifts his putterhead off the ground right before he putts (below).

Let’s back up a minute and look at Rickie’s overall approach.

I like that he steps into these putts with the clear purpose of getting the putterface aimed precisely. He’s deliberate about that. In fact, he sets the face with only his right hand, and completes his grip when the face is perfect. Then he takes one look at the hole and raises the putterhead fractionally off the ground before he starts back.

I want you to try this for two reasons: First, it’ll help take the tension out of your hands and arms, and we all know that tension is a killer on these short ones. Second, it sets up a smooth, even backstroke with no risk of the club getting stuck on the grass. Very clever little move. And just like these other tips, it’ll help you putt like a pro.

 

Link to article: Click here

Straighten your slice with this exercise

Source: GolfDigest

For right-handed golfers (sorry, Bubba), here is the science behind the slice. Ready? The clubface is pointing right of the direction the club is moving as it strikes the ball. That’s it. If the path is straight at the target or moving a little in-to-out in relation to the target, the ball will start right of the target and curve even farther right. If the club’s path is out-to-in in relation to the target line, the ball will start left of the target but curve back to the right. That’s why you often see slicers adjusting their bodies more and more to the left of the target in the hope that they start the ball far enough left that it won’t overshoot the target on the right. Unfortunately, the more they swing out-to-in, the more the ball curves.

There are a lot of things you can do in the golf swing to prevent a slice, but if you want to straighten it out for good, and even start hitting draws, you have to train your body to let the club swing down from the inside. The most common reason amateurs slice the ball is because their bodies block the club from swinging in-to-out. They have to move the club from out-to-in just to get it back to the ball.

Remember that during the downswing, your trunk should rotate toward the target, but the shoulders should not stay level. They need to rotate while you remain in the spine tilt you created when you addressed the ball. That means your right shoulder should move down toward the ball while your left shoulder moves up and away from the target. Most amateurs lack the lower-body stability and mid-back mobility to make this happen. But there is one great exercise you can do in the gym to train your quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, abs and obliques to generate proper trunk rotation. You can even do it as a warm-up before you play. A weighted bar is ideal for doing this exercise, but you can use a golf club or similar. Click on the video below to watch a demonstration.

Video: Click here

Link to article: Click here!

Give back with Penobscot Valley Country Club!

GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY WITH RESURRECTION GOLF!

We’re starting off the New Year with 2 ways to give back at the Penobscot Valley Country Club!

1

When you purchase a membership between now & the end of January, 5% will be given to a local food bank
Click here to purchase online.

2

Feel happy knowing that our kitchens will be donating all food items that cannot be reused!

BUY A MEMBERSHIP TODAY!

Order online, fill out our mail-in form, or call us at (207) 866-2423 to order over the phone!

 Get your Resurrection Pass by Monday, Dec. 17 for guaranteed Christmas delivery!

4 courses, 3 rounds, 1 Resurrection Pass- the BEST Holiday Golf Gift is BACK! 

Good ANYTIME for the 2019 season. No Limits. No Restrictions. 

You will receive 3 INDIVIDUAL Passes in the Mail, you can use them all yourself or give them as gifts!

Manhattan Science Teacher Safely Lands Plane on New Jersey Golf Course

Source: NY Times
By Christina Goldbaum

A Manhattan science teacher by trade, Jonas De Leon is a pilot at heart.

This fall he even began teaching some of his students about aviation at Gregorio Luperon High School for Science and Mathematics, work that was featured in a PBS report on Friday.

Just two days later, Mr. De Leon’s skills as a pilot were put to a terrifying real-life test: The plane he was flying on Sunday made an emergency landing on the ninth hole of a golf course in Paramus, N.J.

Of the four people on the plane when it landed, three sustained minor injuries, Sgt. Michael Pollaro of the Paramus Police Department said.

Ron Dorell, a cashier in the pro shop of the Paramus Golf Course, said he first noticed the small plane circling the course around noon. Eventually it passed over the crest of a hill, out of sight of staff members in the shop.

Minutes later, passers-by who had been driving by the golf course rushed into the clubhouse to report that a plane had landed on the course.

“There’s a lot of open space on the golf course,” Mr. Dorell said, speculating that the pilot might have considered it the best possible landing space in the area.

Only about 18 golfers were on the course when the plane went down, according to Mr. Dorell. Because of a frost delay earlier in the morning, the golfers had only set out at noon and were nowhere near the ninth hole when the plane landed there.

“Normally we are packed on a weekend,” Mr. Dorrell said. “But luckily, because of the frost, we didn’t have anyone out there on the back nine, so none of our golfers were injured.”

Christine La Palma, Mr. De Leon’s partner, said in a phone interview on Sunday that she had just arrived at the hospital where the passengers were taken for treatment, and that she had no information about the circumstances of the landing.

“Right now my only concern is whether everyone is O.K.,” Ms. La Palma said.

In the PBS report, Mr. De Leon is described as having dreamed of learning to fly ever since he was a child watching planes from his parents’ porch. He began taking lessons at 17 and later bought a 1984 single-engine Mooney aircraft.

Becoming a pilot “was the only dream I had that stayed with me,” Mr. De Leon told PBS.

On Sunday, Mr. De Leon took off from Lincoln Park Airport in Lincoln Park, N.J., and landed on the 18-hole course around 12:15 p.m., according to Sergeant Pollaro.

“We tell all our pilots to train as if this will happen to you,” said Richard McSpadden, executive director of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association’s Air Safety Institute. But an emergency landing like this, he said, “is very rare.”

Link to article: Click here

Beer Dinner Moved to Jan. 18!

Fri. January 18th | 7 PM start
$50 per person

Visit us for the 4th installment of our beer dinner series on January 18th! Enjoy 5 courses with individual beer pairings from Mason’s Brewing Co.

Spots are limited, so RSVP today!

Reservations required!
Call (207) 866-1341 to sign up!  

PGA Tour drafting program to provide top college players access to its tours

Source: GolfWeek
By  | December 4, 2018 2:47 pm

Get ready, college golf.

Golfweek has learned about an exciting new venture the PGA Tour is working on that will have a huge impact on the sport.

“The PGA Tour has been working to develop a new program that will identify, prepare and transition top collegiate golfers to professional golf,” according to a Tour statement sent to Golfweek. “This program will be designed to reward season-long collegiate play with varying levels of playing access to tours operated under the PGA Tour umbrella, while upholding the principles and virtues of collegiate athletics.”

In other words, the best college golfers would be guaranteed status on one of several tours, ranging from PGA Tour China to the PGA Tour.

One Tour official with direct knowledge of the project called it “unprecedented.”

Few details have been finalized, and a timetable for the system’s launch is unknown. But the Tour acknowledged this is happening, and there are significant resources devoted to the project. The Tour already is working in collaboration with its policy board, player advisory councils and other stakeholders. It also has asked for feedback from various governing bodies, the NCAA and college coaches.

“We hope that this will elevate our product and our tours,” the Tour official told Golfweek on condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to speak publicly. “But this is not just a one-sided thing. It’s well-rounded.”

The Tour is still working on solidifying the criteria used for determining which players receive cards, though it will be far more dynamic than, for example, just taking the top players from the World Amateur Golf Ranking or other ranking system already in place.

One detail for certain is the program will incentivize players to stay in school and pursue an education.

“If a freshman was to turn pro, are they going to be eligible for this program? Likely not,” the official said.

The news comes about a month after seven top women’s college players earned LPGA status through that tour’s revamped Q-Series. While some players have deferred status until after the spring, several, including Alabama teammates Lauren Stephenson and Kristen Gillman and UCLA’s Lilia Vu, decided to turn pro and leave their college teams in the middle of the season.

While the Tour’s new idea isn’t a response to what the LPGA has done, a focus will be on avoiding that scenario to benefit all parties involved.

“This is an opportunity for a lot of great change,” the official said. “This will hopefully change the landscape of college golf. If you look at other sports leagues, it’s a little bit different. They have draft systems where players go directly to leagues and they are identified through their play in college.
That sort of rough thinking, you know, why doesn’t golf have that? … This hopefully will be a solution to that problem.” Gwk

Link to article: Click here