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Michael Breed: Try My Secret Move To Flush It From Any Lie

Here’s a good tip we found from GolfDigest to help you with muddy lies.

Source: GolfDigest
By Michael Breed

If winter for you meant no golf, I know you’re itching to get back out there. First, we need to do a little prep work. I’ve learned from all my years in New York that spring lies—those muddy ones with no cushion under the ball—are prime territory for fat shots. And when you hit a few of those, you can lose it fast. Let’s talk.

Golfers who are afraid of hitting the ball fat tend to bend over too much, with their weight on their toes. They feel more in control if they’re closer to the ball. But your body will find its balance as you swing, so you’ll pull up and dump the club behind the ball (fat) or hit it thin. To stay in the shot, set your weight in the arches of your feet. Next: ball position. With an iron, play the ball in line with a spot on your body between the buttons on your shirt and your chest logo (short irons in line with the buttons, longer irons farther forward). I’ve got a 6-iron here (see below).

Image: Click here

Now I’m going to give you just one swing key to think about: Drive your left shoulder closer to your left hip as you start the downswing (far right). That’s probably a strange concept for you, so let’s break it down. I want you to shift toward the target and feel like your upper body is leaning that way, your spine tilting left—we call that side bend. That will shift the low point of your swing in front of the ball so you hit the ball, then the ground. You’ll love that crisp impact, and your confidence will soar because you won’t be worrying about the next iffy lie.

That move—left shoulder toward left hip—also causes your upper body to turn open slightly. Perfect, because that brings your arms and the club back in front of your body, which is another key to avoiding fat shots. Golfers blame fat contact on a steep, choppy swing, but a shallow swing will often skim the ground before impact—and that’s fat, too. The common denominator is, the club hits the ground too soon. Driving your left shoulder forward will prevent that and add compression to your strikes.

So get the ball in the right spot, set your weight in your arches, and focus on that left shoulder. You’ll have the pieces in place to hit it solid—and beat those muddy lies. Come on, spring!

BUTTONS TO THE BALL Focus on two positions at address: (1) Weight in the arches of your feet, never on your toes; (2) Ball just ahead of your shirt buttons (for a middle iron).

TURN INTO YOUR RIGHT SIDE Let your weight shift to the heel of your right foot, and be ready to drive forward. What you do next will determine how solidly you strike the ball.

LEFT SHOULDER TO LEFT HIP This is the key move for solid contact: Drive your left shoulder toward your left hip to start down. When you feel like your spine is tilting left, you’ve got it.

Michael Breed is Golf Digest’s Chief Digital Instructor.


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How to hit the deceptive ‘fluffy’ lie chip shot, according to a three-time PGA Tour winner

Source: GOLF.com
By GOLF Editors

PGA Tour player Russell Henley explains how to hit the tricky, fluffy chip shot…

You missed the green, but hey, the ball’s sitting up in the rough. Good, right? Maybe. In this situation, it’s not always certain how the ball will come out. As with all short-game shots, crisp contact is the key.

Step 1: Even if you’re short-sided, refrain from opening the face too much. With the ball up, you risk sliding the club right underneath it if you add extra loft. The ball won’t go anywhere. I keep the face square in this situation, or barely opened if I really need more loft to stop it close.

Step 2: I swing as if I’m hitting a little draw, with the club moving in-to-out and my hands rolling over slightly through impact. This helps the club remain shallow, which usually results in cleaner contact. My main thought is to get as many grooves on the ball as possible. Think “glide,” not “chop.”

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Straighten your slice with this exercise

Source: GolfDigest

For right-handed golfers (sorry, Bubba), here is the science behind the slice. Ready? The clubface is pointing right of the direction the club is moving as it strikes the ball. That’s it. If the path is straight at the target or moving a little in-to-out in relation to the target, the ball will start right of the target and curve even farther right. If the club’s path is out-to-in in relation to the target line, the ball will start left of the target but curve back to the right. That’s why you often see slicers adjusting their bodies more and more to the left of the target in the hope that they start the ball far enough left that it won’t overshoot the target on the right. Unfortunately, the more they swing out-to-in, the more the ball curves.

There are a lot of things you can do in the golf swing to prevent a slice, but if you want to straighten it out for good, and even start hitting draws, you have to train your body to let the club swing down from the inside. The most common reason amateurs slice the ball is because their bodies block the club from swinging in-to-out. They have to move the club from out-to-in just to get it back to the ball.

Remember that during the downswing, your trunk should rotate toward the target, but the shoulders should not stay level. They need to rotate while you remain in the spine tilt you created when you addressed the ball. That means your right shoulder should move down toward the ball while your left shoulder moves up and away from the target. Most amateurs lack the lower-body stability and mid-back mobility to make this happen. But there is one great exercise you can do in the gym to train your quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, abs and obliques to generate proper trunk rotation. You can even do it as a warm-up before you play. A weighted bar is ideal for doing this exercise, but you can use a golf club or similar. Click on the video below to watch a demonstration.

Video: Click here

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